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Nerium

nerium

Despite being poisonous, nerium oleander is commonly used as a skin cancer treatment, so what will it do for your wrinkles?  Nerium International markets their product as an anti-wrinkle treatment and a lucrative business opportunity. This is where I start to see red flags.  Personally, I am not a fan of multi-level companies. They all tend to over-hype a “newly discovered ingredient” and rarely do their products deliver. Not to mention, all the sign up fee’s, auto-ship programs, recruiting meetings… what a drag! Before you know it, you have a closet full on unused product and your friends have mysteriously stopped taking your calls.

I hate to jump to conclusions,  Nerium could be different, it definitely deserves a fair chance. Let’s see what all the hype is about and if Nerium is worth the investment!

RELATED: Click Here to See the Top Recommended Wrinkle Creams

How Does Nerium Diminish Wrinkles?

“During advanced research on the uses of the nerium oleander plant, an accidental discovery was made: the simple properties of nerium oleander provided remarked age-defying results when applied to the skin,” says the official website.

On one hand, I was concerned because Nerium’s main ingredient is poisonous. But the company has so much confidence in it — maybe they know something I don’t?  I decided to find the truth.

The official website never actually explains how nerium oleander works. They just say it reduces these signs of aging:

• Fine lines and wrinkles
• Uneven skin texture
• Enlarged pores
• Age spots

Learning how nerium oleander works would help me discover if it works, so I started looking for research. I found one study by Robert A. Newman, Ph.D., who works for Nerium International. But he used to work at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, and that’s where he performed this study. Here’s what the study reveals:

Nerium oleander contains cardiac glycosides, which are toxic. They are the reason the ingredient is poisonous when ingested. When cardiac glycosides were combined with malignant cancer cells, oxidative stress increased and the cancer cells died.[1]

The Low-Down on Oxidative Stress

Oxidative stress isn’t usually considered a good thing. It may kill unhealthy cells, but it destroys healthy cells, too. In fact, many skin care products use antioxidants to prevent oxidative stress because it speeds up skin’s aging process.

If nerium oleander is applied to skin, is there any proof the cardiac glycosides can distinguish between healthy and unhealthy cells? I couldn’t find any.

I wish the company would explain why they believe Nerium diminishes wrinkles. My research shows the main ingredient is more likely to damage skin than anything else.

Clinical Study on Nerium

The company admits to knowing nerium oleander is dangerous. So, one of their highest priorities was making sure Nerium is safe.

The wrinkle cream was given to an independent research firm, which tested Nerium on an undisclosed number of participants. After using Nerium, the participants’ faces were scanned using advanced technology.

Nerium International claims the study showed Nerium effectively diminished wrinkles without causing any side effects. However, they don’t disclose the study design or details.

The official website has several before and after pictures. So, it appears Nerium worked for several participants, but how many people participated and how many got results? Nerium.com doesn’t provide a reference, so I couldn’t find the study.

Are the Study Results Reliable?

I’d like to believe the company’s claim about the study, but something just doesn’t seem right. Why are they withholding study information? If the results are completely in their favor, there’s no reason to hide the details.

Perhaps, the study was as remarkable as they say, but they didn’t think consumers would be interested in the details. I’d rather have too much information than not enough because the lack of information is making me skeptical.

What Do Users Say About Nerium?

Since I wasn’t getting answers from the company, I decided to read users reviews. I found 110 reviews on Amazon.com. The average rating given was 3.1 out of 5 stars. This average resulted because half the users gave 5 stars and the other half gave 1 star. Just a few gave 2-4 star ratings.

Only 4 of the 47 5-star reviews were written by people who purchased Nerium from Amazon.com. It could be the reviews were written by people who purchased Nerium elsewhere. But it also sounds like many reviews were written, not by users, but by company distributors.

These 5-star reviews were extremely positive; some only talked about how remarkable the “science” is. Several also encouraged people to buy from distributors rather than Amazon.com.

40 users left negative reviews for 3 main reasons. 1. They didn’t notice any improvements after using Nerium. Some even used it for 3-4 months. 2. Side effects were very common. Users said Nerium caused acne breakouts, itching, severe rashes, swelling, and irritation.

3. Several users were ripped off by the company’s auto-ship program. They said the company ignored cancellation requests and then wouldn’t accept returns.

You can also read customer reviews on Nerium’s Facebook page. But the company deletes negative reviews, so the reviews on Facebook are positive.

The Cost

Nerium International doesn’t actually sell its product. Instead, it uses a pyramid scheme to recruit people to sell Nerium.

You can find a distributor on the Facebook page or by contacting the company. There are also a few sites that sell Nerium. I have no idea how much distributors charge, but these are the prices you’ll find online:

• eBay.com – $79.50 (price varies from listing to listing)
• Amazon.com – $94.95
• Sears.com – $156.32

From what I’ve read, it’s very difficult to get a refund for Nerium. These 3 retailers don’t have return policies. Nerium.com features a 30-day money back guarantee, but I’m not sure how it works, since you can’t buy from the site. Also, several users said they were unable to get refunds from the company.

Nerium – A Buy or a Bust?

Even after thoroughly analyzing Nerium, I’m left with more questions and concerns than answers. How does it work? The only study I found shows nerium oleander damages cells. Was it researched? If the study was successful, why doesn’t the company share more details? And why do almost half of users say Nerium doesn’t work and causes side effects?

I’m not confident Nerium is safe or effective. And $79-$157 is way too much to pay for a product you’re not confident about. I recommend buying a wrinkle cream backed by clinically researched, safe ingredients; not Nerium. Your friends can thank me later!

If you want a wrinkle cream that is guaranteed to improve the look and feel of your skin (with no strings attached) make sure you check out ConsumerWrinkleReviews.com’s Top 10 Wrinkle Creams.

References

[1] Newman, RA. “Oleandrin-mediated oxidative stress in human melanoma cells.” Journal of Experimental Therapeutics and Oncology. 5. (2006): 167-81.

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